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Alaska Boundary Dispute
Dispute des frontières de l’Alaska

© The Begbie Contest Society - La Société du Concours Begbie
Multiple Perspectives - perspectives multiple


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Library of Congress




Panning gold during the Klondike Gold Rush, George G. Murdock, LAC, 1897, C-005389








N.W.M.P. Town Station on 4th Avenue, Dawson, Yukon,  Stuart Taylor Wood, 
LAC C-022074, 1898




Klondike Trail of '98, J. D. Kelly and Thomas Wilberforce Mitchell




1899 E.A. Hegg, LAC C-005142




Packing up Chilkoot Pass, LAC, C-004490



 







 






 



 







 















 



 




Judge, 7 Jan 1899







 
Library and Archives Canada, CSM-1300-1c


 
 







 







 







 



 




Monroe Doctrine, 1900



 







 



 







 



"I will appoint three commissioners to meet three commissioners, if they so desire, but I think I shall instruct our three commissioners when appointed that they are in no case to yield any of our claim."
                                                                 Theodore Roosevelt, 16 July 1902







 











 
 


 
  


 

 

 

 

 
 



 


 

 

 



"Canadians are becoming weary of negotiating with Washington through London, and of the solemn and elaborate farces called arbitration which for one hundred and twenty years have been robbing Canada to enrich the United States."
Daily Mail, London, dispatch from its Toronto correspondent, Oct. 1903


"[The Downing Street decision represented] the most cold-blooded case of absolutely giving away our interests . . . My view in watching the diplomacy of Great Britain as affecting Canada for six years is that it may just as well be decided in advance that practically whatever the United States demands from England will be conceded in the long run."
Clifford Sifton, letter to J. W. Defoe



 



 











 



 



 







 


















 
  
 

 








 
 

 
 
 






 

 




"We have suffered on the Atlantic, we have suffered on the Pacific, we have suffered wherever there has been a question to be discussed between British diplomats and foreign diplomats."
                                         Sir Wilfrid Laurier, speech, 26 September 1907